Penguins

Penguins are unlike most other birds. They cannot fly and their bones are solid rather than hollow making the birds too heavy. However, they are great swimmers. Their wings are in the form of flippers. Like all aquatic birds, they have webbed feet. Their short legs make them clumsy on land but enable them to waddle.

Penguins look for their food in the water, so swimming is important. Their eyesight underwater is acute. But in the water, predators lurk. If you were to look at a penguin you might notice his or her black and white feathers. Those feathers keep the bird warm in the ocean. The color of the feathers helps provide counter-shading. From below, predators below the penguin see its black back as part of the water. Looking into the sun, predators below the penguin see its white belly as part of the water too.

There are many different types of penguins. Those include the Emperor, King, Adelie, Gentoo, Chinstrap, Rockhopper, Macaroni, Magellanic, and Humboldt Penguins. Most people think that penguins are endemic to the cold Antarctic, but they can be found all over the southern hemisphere, even in warm places.

Most penguins lay only 2 eggs, but Emperor and King Penguins lay only one. Most species of these flightless birds mate for life. Both father and mother penguins care for their young. After foraging out at sea, they will regurgitate some food for the chick to eat. Father penguins even help incubate the eggs before they hatch. As penguin chicks mature, they will molt. That way they will develop waterproof feathers that are perfect for swimming.